An Independent School • Grades 5-12

Led by head coach Rick Huegli and assistant coach Erica Pitman, the Lakeside strength and conditioning program's committed athlete platform recognizes student-athletes who demonstrate qualities and characteristics that exude commitment, leadership, and confident competence in the weight room.

Lakeside student-athletes who exemplify the following traits are looked at as potential committed athletes:

  • Consistent attendance to training sessions that have been arranged;
  • Consistent attendance to training sessions beyond regular in-season team sessions;
  • Appropriate effectiveness and training intensity of workouts;
  • Proactive communication with strength and conditioning staff; 
  • Punctuality;
  • Positive attitude toward self and others during workout sessions; and,
  • Leadership example.

"We want to be purposeful about the way we train and the way we are building competence in our student-athletes," Huegli said. "Our objective each and every day is to grow and promote a culture of commitment and personal responsibility within our student-athletes. We're really laying the foundation of our strength program by rolling out the committed athlete platform."

In addition to being highlighted on the Lakeside Athletics website, student-athletes (one boy and one girl) who are selected will be featured in the weight room with their name written on the wall for all to see. Those selected will also receive a strength and conditioning t-shirt that highlights their accomplishments.

Huegli recently named Charlie H. ’20 and Miriam C. ’20 as Lakeside committed athletes.

Coach Huegli commented on the efforts of these two newest members of the committed athlete group.

"I am excited to acknowledge Charlie and Miriam as our most current Committed Athletes. Both more than exemplify what this recognition is about by demonstrating excellent discipline, work ethic, and accountability but more importantly, their selflessness and willingness to be examples of what leadership and commitment looks like every time they come to train.”

After learning of their selection as committed athletes, Charlie and Miriam talked about what it means to be recognized.

Charlie H.:

1. Describe what being a committed athlete at Lakeside looks like to you.

Being a committed athlete is about making becoming a better athlete a priority in your life at Lakeside. They can’t only show up and work hard when they feel like it or when it’s convenient; they have to push through the hard days, too. During high school, hard days are common. A student can find any number of excuses to drop commitments, but these need to be seen as obstacles to attack rather than reasons to hold back.

2. How have you benefited from being a part of the strength and conditioning program at Lakeside?

The Lakeside strength and conditioning program has certainly made me physically stronger and a better athlete, but it has also taught me about commitment and how to push myself mentally. It is probably one of the least immediately-rewarding things that I do. It is easy to struggle to see what the reward for doing so would be because there is often nobody watching all the work I’m putting in and I can’t transform myself physically in one day. Being a part of the strength and conditioning program has shown me that consistent hard work will pay off in the long run.

3. As a student-athlete, what would you pass along to your peers about becoming more of a committed athlete?

To me, being more committed all mental. No matter what level you are at right now, you can get stronger or become a better athlete, if you want to. You can’t only be motivated by wanting to prove something to others. You have to be motivated by wanting to prove something to yourself. Whether it is wanting to prove that you can get better, get stronger, push yourself a little bit further, you have to find something within yourself that makes you want to be better.

Miriam C.:

1. Describe what being a committed athlete at Lakeside looks like to you.

Being a committed athlete means you bring your full self to every practice and exercise. You don’t have to be the fastest or the strongest, or even be having a good day, you just have to be focused and try hard. Doing an exercise well a few times is better than doing it badly many times. It’s also okay to take a break, either in a workout or during the week, as long as you come back from that break ready to get to work.

2. How have you benefited from being a part of the strength and conditioning program at Lakeside?

The strength and conditioning program has taught me that I am stronger than I think, and that fitness is as much about mental fortitude as it is about physical ability. I have learned to listen to my body and to push myself even when I am tired. The program increased my strength, which positively impacted my swimming, but it also taught me to be much more in tune with my body, which made me more efficient. Overall, strength and conditioning gave me a concrete way to improve my fitness and see progress.

3. As a student-athlete, what would you pass along to your peers about becoming more of a committed athlete?

Listen well to both your body and your coaches and don’t be afraid to ask questions. You can’t get better unless you learn what you are doing wrong, and it’s far worse to injure yourself than it is to modify an exercise or lift five pounds less than you want to. Keeping a good balance is always key. Keep your commitments, but make sure you have enough time for sleep and relaxation. You won’t do well as an athlete if you are constantly overwhelmed.

Congratulations, Charlie and Miriam!

Follow Lakeside's strength and conditioning program on Twitter at @LakesideLionsSC.