An Independent School • Grades 5-12

High School Academic Courses

Courses are designed for students entering grades 9 – 12 and are open to students from any school.

Why spend the summer in class? Students value the ability to delve deeply into one content area without other demands on their schedule, and engage in immersive learning environments like the IslandWood environmental learning center. For-credit classes help students fulfill a graduation requirement in order to free up space in their school-year schedule. And rising juniors and seniors can get a jump on the college application process with classes for the SAT, ACT, and college essay-writing.

Prerequisites are required for some for-credit courses.

Financial aid is available.

Important Dates for 2018

Feb. 1: Registration opens for Lakeside students and children of Lakeside alumni.

Mar. 1: Registration opens for students not attending Lakeside.

June 1: Forms and recommendations due for students not attending Lakeside. Registration closes.

June 15: All payments due.

July 4: No classes will be held in observance of the Independence Day holiday. Courses will be held as usual the rest of the week.

Financial aid: The program awards financial assistance according to demonstrated family need on a first-come, first-served basis. Financial aid forms returned by the first of each month will receive award notification by the 15th of that month. Lakeside Families: Refer to the Financial Aid application to see if you need to complete additional paperwork.

The Global Online Academy has launched a catalog of summer courses. These classes are only available to students currently attending GOA member schools. Grades will appear on your Lakeside transcript. For more information, and to see what classes are offered, visit: http://www.globalonlineacademy.org/summer-courses/

2018 Courses

Science

Biology (S100)
$3,125
6/25 – 8/3
Islandwood: 7/15 – 7/19
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

As Lakeside's introductory science course, Biology provides students an initial opportunity to become familiar with science as a way of thinking. Students will learn to collect, analyze, and interpret information, as well as how to effectively communicate scientific concepts. Student-focused discussions, exploratory activities, and laboratory exercises are designed to enhance scientific literacy. The class will introduce students to a broad range of biological concepts, including ecology, gene expression, and cell structure/function, with a particular emphasis on the core concepts of evolution and genetics. Students will spend one week at IslandWood on Bainbridge Island immersed in their studies and doing field research. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Physics (S200)
$1,895
6/25 – 8/3
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This lab-based course is an introduction to the physical world through hands-on and theoretical investigations. Students will investigate ideas surrounding motion, force, momentum, energy, and circuits. Topics include waves, light, circular motion, Newtonian laws, and electricity. Prerequisites: Biology (S100), Algebra II (M210) or Honors Geometry (M320). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Lakeside Summer Research Institute
No cost
6/25 - 7/20
8:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. (Lunch is included.)
3 students will be accepted for Summer 2018.

Applications will be accepted until April 20. Acceptance letters will be sent by May 1.

The Lakeside Summer Research Institute is a four-week summer research experience in which students engage in mentored research projects with tangible, externally-visible outcomes (e.g. peer-reviewed publications, patents, educational blog posts) on Lakeside campus. This year the LSRI will be focused on Avalanche Science and Safety Practices.

Successful applicants are responsible, motivated students in good academic standing at their current institution. They will have demonstrated facility with data analysis (e.g. managing, plotting, and summarizing data) in Excel or Python. Prerequisites: One year of high-school lab science. This course is open to rising 10th-12th grade students. This is a skill-building, internship-style course that earns no credit.

Lakeside students should register online and return this LSRI-specific personal essay form as part of their application.

Math

Algebra II (M210)
$1,895
6/25 – 8/3
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Note: This course is fully enrolled. If you would like to be added to our wait list, please email summerschool@lakesideschool.org.

The course focuses on the analysis of functions and their applications while introducing students to a variety of topics in discrete mathematics. After exploring the algebraic, graphical, and numerical properties of general functions, specific types of functions will be examined from these perspectives. The course will examine each of the following families of functions: linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric. Additional topics in discrete mathematics such as statistics, matrices, combinatorics, and probability will give students the tools to analyze interesting, highly relevant problems. Both computers and graphing calculators will be used throughout the course. Students will also learn dynamic spreadsheets to further their understanding of the mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: Algebra I (M110). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Precalculus (M400)
$1,895
6/25 - 8/3
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The focus of Precalculus is on the concept of function and the use of functions as mathematical models. Topics necessary for success in either a calculus or a statistics course (including conic sections, regression techniques, trigonometry, and limits) will be studied. Students should anticipate some review of material from previous courses as a bridge toward more advanced understanding.Topics in computer programming including variables, expressions, scripts, conditional, loops, and functions will be reviewed and used regularly to explore mathematical content. Prerequisite: Geometry (M300). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Computer Science I (M542)
$950
7/16 - 8/3
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course is open to all students with little or no programming experience who want to go beyond just using computer applications. Computer Science I is an introduction to how computers work and how to write software. Technical expertise or prior programming experience is not required, only an open mind and a willingness to experiment, explore, and have some serious fun. Students will learn some basics of programming in the Python language by writing a series of programs defined by their instructor. They will then have the opportunity to follow their own interests and pursue more complex projects that may require them to learn new, more advanced programming techniques. Quizzes will be used to check understanding of basic programming concepts, but the majority of the grade will be determined by successful completion of teacher and student defined projects. This course is designed as an introductory experience for students who are curious about computers and programming, but who have limited or no formal training. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one semester of credit.

History/Social Science

World History: The Human Web (H100)
$1,895
6/25 – 8/3
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

How did the world get so connected? To what end has power been used by individuals, empires, and groups of people? This is a survey of the formative events, ideas, and conditions of the world from the rise of Islam to the Age of Enlightenment (from the eighth to 18th centuries). Using project-based learning, students will practice the skills necessary for successful historical inquiry: critical reading of a variety of sources, cogent analytical writing, participating successfully in class discussions, engaging in substantive research, and speaking persuasively. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

United States History (H300)
$1,895
6/25 - 8/3
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

James Baldwin asserted that “the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” This yearlong course provides students with a foundation for understanding the modern United States in all of its complexity. It also provides a foundation for active citizenship, exploring themes of power, the establishment of a republican form of government, and the intersection of politics and economics. The course is built around essential questions in the study of United States history, such as how foreign policy has changed over the past two centuries. Writing is an important feature of the offering, and students will engage in both historical analysis and research projects. Motivated students who wish to take the United States AP exam are encouraged to consult their teacher early in the year regarding additional preparation to increase the chances of success. Prerequisites: H100 and H200. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

English

9th/10th Grade Writing
$750
Session 1: 6/25 – 7/13
Session 2: 7/16 – 8/3
8:30 – 10:30 a.m.

This course will provide training in different modes of writing, particularly analytical writing, to help students at the freshman and sophomore level. Special attention will be paid to critical thinking, organization, clarity, proper use of grammar and punctuation, and citation protocol. Students will study various short works of literature (stories, poems, plays, and essays) to orient writing tasks and will engage in conferencing as well as peer-editing workshops to work through various drafts. No prerequisites. This is a skill-building course that is ungraded, and earns no credit.

9th/10th Grade Literature
$750
6/25 – 7/13
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

We grow up hearing, reading, telling, and writing stories; indeed, some of our favorite and most formative memories are tied to the stories of our childhoods. The central premise of this class is that good writers are necessarily good readers, and with this in mind, we will read a great deal of published short fiction together, placing a strong emphasis on issues of craft. The class will be reading as writers rather than as literary critics, examining choices writers make for their stories about their characters, plot, point of view, setting, style, structure, tone, and so forth. No prerequisites. This is a skill-building course that is ungraded, and earns no credit.

Arts

Introduction to Photography (A170)
$1,895
6/25 - 8/3
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course is designed to expose students to the creative and technical aspects of photography while establishing a foundation in the visual arts. Students work with both black and white film and digital cameras, building skills behind the camera, in the darkroom, and with digital imagining tools. Students will gain a solid grounding in camera controls and printmaking while learning to appreciate the role that composition, design, color and light play in the visual arts. Students will have an opportunity to exhibit and showcase their photographs and learn to use digital tools for archiving and sharing their artwork. Film and printing supplies are provided by the school. Some cameras may be available for students to borrow, although they may prefer their own cameras. This course requires students to have a 35mm single lens reflex film camera, one which allows you to adjust aperture and shutter speed. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.


College Counseling

The College Application Essay

$525

Session 1: 6/25 - 6/29
Session 2: 7/16 - 7/20
9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Ever wonder what admissions officers really look for in a personal statement? This week-long course focuses on brainstorming, drafting, and revising the college application essay. Intended for rising seniors who want to devote a full week to writing their essay, this course offers students support and guidance through what can be an intimidating enterprise. Class activities may include guided writing, brainstorming activities, discussions, and editing workshops. By the end of the week, students who participate fully should have a strong draft of their personal essay completed. Prerequisites: Open to rising seniors only. This is an ungraded course earning no credit.

SAT Prep

$850
Session 1: 7/9 – 7/20
Session 2: 8/6 – 8/17
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (1 p.m. on mock exam days)

This two-week course will be taught by professionals from Applerouth Tutoring Services. The course will focus on all three sections of the SAT and will be dynamically tailored to meet the needs of individuals and the group. The curriculum includes math and grammar content alongside strategies for reading, writing, math, and the essay. Students will learn how to mange their attention, working memory, and other mental resources to approach the test methodically and consistently. The course will provide a variety of opportunities to practice these strategies through classwork, homework, and two full-length practice tests using official materials. Every student will receive two books: one official book of practice tests (College Board Study Guide) and Applerouth's own Guide to the SAT. Open to rising juniors and seniors only. This is not a graded class but students will receive individual comments.

ACT Prep

$850
Session 1: 7/2 – 7/13
Session 2: 8/6 – 8/17
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (1 p.m. on mock exam days)

This two-week course will be taught by professionals from Applerouth Tutoring Services. The course will focus on all four sections of the ACT and will be dynamically tailored to meet the needs of individuals and the group. The curriculum includes math and grammar content alongside strategies for reading, writing, math, science, and the essay. Students will learn how to mange their attention, working memory, and other mental resources to approach the test methodically and consistently. The course will provide a variety of opportunities to practice these strategies through classwork, homework, and two full-length practice tests using official materials. Every student will receive two books: one official book of ACT practice tests and Applerouth's own Guide to the ACT. Open to rising juniors and seniors only. This is not a graded class but students will receive individual comments.

Service Learning

Service Learning Experience: Homelessness in Seattle
$325
June 25- June 29
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

This week-long course exposes students to the general issues that relate to homelessness, as well as the specific needs of people who experience homelessness in the Seattle metropolitan area. Using the city as a classroom, students will work alongside local non-profit agencies to make a measurable impact on our community. We will start our week learning definitions of home, house, poverty, homelessness, Fair Housing Act, and more so that students have the foundation to communicate what they will be experiencing and doing. Our service work will expand students’ understanding of issues related to homelessness and expose them to people and organizations doing important work in the community. Potential service-learning projects may include: preparing a shelter for its nightly clients, helping to build a home with Habitat for Humanity, sorting and packing rescued food at a food bank, and refurbishing appliances and building materials for subsidized housing. Students must be 16 by June 25 to register. This is an ungraded course earning no credit, but hours may be applied to graduation requirements (check with your school).

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