An Independent School • Grades 5-12

High School Academic Courses

Courses are designed for students entering grades 9 – 12 and are open to students from any school.

Why spend the summer in class? Students value the ability to delve deeply into one content area without other demands on their schedule, and engage in immersive learning environments like the IslandWood environmental learning center. For-credit classes help students fulfill a graduation requirement in order to free up space in their school-year schedule. And rising juniors and seniors can get a jump on the college application process with classes for the SAT, ACT, and college essay-writing.

Prerequisites are required for some for-credit courses.

Financial aid is available.

Important Dates for 2019

Feb. 1: Registration opens for Lakeside students and children of Lakeside alumni.

Feb. 25: Registration opens for students not attending Lakeside.

June 1: Registration closes. Forms and recommendations due for students not attending Lakeside.

June 15: All payments due.

July 4: No classes will be held in observance of the Independence Day holiday. Courses will be held as usual the rest of the week.

Financial aid: The program awards financial assistance according to demonstrated family need on a first-come, first-served basis. You may choose to apply for aid during the registration process. Lakeside Families: If you apply for aid as part of the registration process, you may choose to use the financial aid information already on file with Lakeside.

The Global Online Academy has launched a catalog of summer courses. These classes are only available to students currently attending GOA member schools. Grades will appear on your Lakeside transcript. For more information, and to see what classes are offered, visit: http://www.globalonlineacademy.org/summer-courses/

 

2019 Courses

Science

Biology (S100)
$3,250
6/24 – 8/2
Islandwood: 7/14 – 7/18
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

As Lakeside's introductory science course, Biology provides students an initial opportunity to become familiar with science as a way of thinking. Students will learn to collect, analyze, and interpret information, as well as how to effectively communicate scientific concepts. Student-focused discussions, exploratory activities, and laboratory exercises are designed to enhance scientific literacy. The class will introduce students to a broad range of biological concepts, including ecology, gene expression, and cell structure/function, with a particular emphasis on the core concepts of evolution and genetics. Students will spend one week at IslandWood on Bainbridge Island immersed in their studies and doing field research. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Physics (S200)
$1,950
6/24 – 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This lab-based course is an introduction to the physical world through hands-on and theoretical investigations. Students will investigate ideas surrounding motion, force, momentum, energy, and circuits. Students will also deepen data analysis and communication skills they have learned in prior science, math, and language arts classes. They will develop functional graphical and mathematical models of the physical world by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting real-world data. They will be asked to effectively communicate scientific and quantitative concepts they derive. Prerequisites: Biology (S100), Algebra II (M210) or Honors Geometry (M320). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Lakeside Summer Research Institute
$1,250
6/24 - 7/19
8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. 
Four students will be accepted for summer 2019.

The Lakeside Summer Research Institute is a four-week summer research experience in which students engage in mentored research projects with tangible, externally-visible outcomes (e.g., educational blog posts, presentations at regional and national conferences, peer-reviewed publications) on Lakeside campus. This year the LSRI will be focused on two topics: 1) Avalanche Science and Safety Practices and 2) the Weather and Climate of Mount Baker. Students will interact with professional scientists at University of Washington and the United States Forest Service. Interested students can earn at least 12 hours of Service Learning credit by participating in a day of trail maintenance and field work on Mount Baker.

Successful applicants are responsible, motivated students in good academic standing at their current institution. They will have demonstrated facility with data analysis (e.g., managing, plotting, and summarizing data) in Excel or Python.

How to apply: Interested students should register via the Summer School registration link Feb. 1 - April 1. Within a week of registration, an application will be emailed to individual applicants. Acceptance letters will be sent by April 15. Prerequisites: One year of high-school lab science. This course is open to rising 10th-12th-grade students. This is a skill-building, internship-style course that earns no credit.
 

 

Math

Algebra II (M210)
$1,950
6/24 – 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

The course focuses on the analysis of functions and their applications while introducing students to a variety of topics in discrete mathematics. After exploring the algebraic, graphical, and numerical properties of general functions, specific types of functions will be examined from these perspectives. The course will examine each of the following families of functions: linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric. Additional topics in discrete mathematics such as statistics, matrices, combinatorics, and probability will give students the tools to analyze interesting, highly relevant problems. Both computers and graphing calculators will be used throughout the course. Students will also learn dynamic spreadsheets to further their understanding of the mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: Algebra I (M110). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Precalculus (M400)
$1,950
6/24 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The focus of Precalculus is on the concept of function and the use of functions as mathematical models. Topics necessary for success in either a calculus or a statistics course (including conic sections, regression techniques, trigonometry, and limits) will be studied. Students should anticipate some review of material from previous courses as a bridge toward more advanced understanding. Topics in computer programming including variables, expressions, scripts, conditional, loops, and functions will be reviewed and used regularly to explore mathematical content. Prerequisite: Geometry (M300). This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Computer Science I (M542)
$975
6/24 - 7/12
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course is open to all students with little or no programming experience who want to go beyond just using computer applications. Computer Science I is an introduction to how computers work and how to write software. Technical expertise or prior programming experience is not required, only an open mind and a willingness to experiment, explore, and have some serious fun. Students will learn some basics of programming in the Python language by writing a series of programs defined by their instructor. They will then have the opportunity to follow their own interests and pursue more complex projects that may require them to learn new, more advanced programming techniques. Quizzes will be used to check understanding of basic programming concepts, but the majority of the grade will be determined by successful completion of teacher and student defined projects. This course is designed as an introductory experience for students who are curious about computers and programming, but who have limited or no formal training. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one semester of credit.

Computer Science II (M543)
$975
6/24 - 7/12
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This fast-paced course introduces students to computer programming through the Java language. The course begins by studying elementary algorithms, data types, flow of control, user input, file input/output, recursion and some graphical applications using procedural programming techniques. Problem analysis, planning, coding, and debugging will be emphasized for each project. This course will also teach principals and techniques of software engineering (software life cycle, programming practices, etc.). Students with a programming background in Java or another language can refine their skills by choosing to complete more complex projects. This course when combined with Computer Science III prepares students for success on the AP Computer Science exam in May. Prerequisites: Successful completion Computer Science I or equivalent course.

Computer Science III (M544)
$975
7/15 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course is a continuation of Computer Science II covering object-oriented programming and inheritance in Java, more advanced data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees), and the efficiency and complexity algorithms (particularly searching, sorting). Problem analysis, planning, coding, and debugging will be emphasized for each project. This course prepares students for success on the AP Computer Science Exam in May. Students also design and complete a three-to-five-week long independent project, culminating in a presentation to the class at the end of the course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Computer Science II.

History/Social Science

World History I: The Human Web (H100)
$1,950
6/24 – 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

How did the world get so connected? To what end has power been used by individuals, empires, and groups of people? This is a survey of the formative events, ideas, and conditions of the world from the rise of Islam to the Age of Enlightenment (from the eighth to 18th centuries). Using project-based learning, students will practice the skills necessary for successful historical inquiry: critical reading of a variety of sources, cogent analytical writing, participating successfully in class discussions, engaging in substantive research, and speaking persuasively. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

United States History (H300)
$1,950
6/24 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

James Baldwin asserted that “the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” This yearlong course provides students with a foundation for understanding the modern United States in all of its complexity. It also provides a foundation for active citizenship, exploring themes of power, the establishment of a republican form of government, and the intersection of politics and economics. The course is built around essential questions in the study of United States history, such as how foreign policy has changed over the past two centuries. Writing is an important feature of the offering, and students will engage in both historical analysis and research projects. Motivated students who wish to take the United States AP exam are encouraged to consult their teacher early in the year regarding additional preparation to increase the chances of success. Prerequisites: H100 and H200. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

 

English

9th/10th Grade Writing
$770
6/24 – 7/12
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course will provide training in different modes of writing, particularly analytical writing, to help students at the 9th- and 10th-grade levels. Special attention will be paid to critical thinking, organization, clarity, proper use of grammar and punctuation, and citation protocol. Students will study various short works of literature (stories, poems, plays, and essays) to orient writing tasks and will engage in conferencing as well as peer-editing workshops to work through various drafts. No prerequisites. This is a skill-building course that is ungraded and earns no credit.

English 10 (E200)
$1,950
6/24 – 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course explores how authors from diverse international backgrounds have used literature to explore personal, cultural, and national identities as well as related issues of social justice. Together, we investigate the ways in which literature can be a vehicle for the creation and reflection of culture and identity, and for the understanding of and resistance to power and privilege. In addition, we study the specific characteristics and effects of different literary genres, principally fiction (novels and short fiction), drama, poetry, and literary nonfiction. By learning about the elements of literature through critical reading, students also hone their own expressive skills through a range of analytical, creative, personal, and persuasive writing assignments, as well as through public speaking, collaborative assignments, and creative projects. Texts include Jhumpa Lahiri’s “Interpreter of Maladies,” Edwidge Danticat’s “The Dew Breaker,” Evan Placey’s “Pronoun,” Trevor Noah’s “Born A Crime,” a play by Shakespeare, and additional novels, short stories, poems, and works of nonfiction. Prerequisites: E100 or one year of high-school English. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Science Fiction and the Future of Humanity
$975
7/15 – 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

We are cyborgs – cybernetic organisms – whether we like to admit it or not.  Our daily lives – all across the globe – are suffused with technology, with algorithms, smart phones, and devices of all kinds, so we must ask: How will we evolve as a society, as a species, and what are our moral imperatives and responsibilities?  What can science fiction – in literature and film – from around the world teach us about what we are and what we may become?  Should we let computer systems, robotics, and AI evolve unchecked? This course will concentrate on three areas: artificial intelligence, bioengineering, and utopian social schemes.  Texts studied will include "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" by Philip K. Dick, "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood, Aldous Huxley’s "Brave New World", as well as short fiction by international authors from China, South Africa, Poland, and USA, among others. Students will supplement their textual analysis with a critical study of films like "Gattaca," "Her," and "Blade Runner." In addition, this course will look at current issues and scientific experiments, and write in a variety of modes ranging from analysis to creative writing.  Students will complete various kinds of creative projects and give presentations on different topics, including new technologies. Prerequisites: E100 and E200 or two years of high-school English. This is a graded course earning one semester of credit.

Languages

Spanish III: GSL in Costa Rica
$5,200
6/24-8/2
On-campus component: 6/24-7/5 and 7/30- 8/2
Costa Rica trip: July 7- July 29

This course is open only to Lakeside students.

This course, which includes three weeks of classroom instruction at Lakeside School, as well as an immersive three-week homestay and service learning experience in Costa Rica, focuses on the complex connections between human culture and the environment. By studying with a Spanish teacher two-to-four hours a day throughout the six-week program, students will deepen their knowledge of Spanish grammar and syntax, with the goal of improving communication and cultural exchange during their time in Costa Rica. The immersive Global Service Learning portion of the program will take place at Cirenas, a non-profit organization on the Nicoya peninsula that specializes in sustainable development and environmental conservation. While living in homestays and completing service projects, students will not only improve their conversational Spanish but also deepen their understanding of the complex ways in which culture and history shape—and are shaped by—the natural world.

Time commitment and cost: Students in the course must participate in all the Seattle-based components of the class as well as the GSL experience. The cost of this course includes all GSL travel expenses, including air travel. Financial aid is available. A student may count up to 20 hours of Global Service Learning hours toward Lakeside’s graduation requirement of 80 hours of service. The school reserves the right to change the GSL location in case of emergency or changed conditions at the original site.  

How to apply: Students may register anytime Feb. 1 - April 1 using the link emailed to Lakeside families in January. This email will include an additional GSL survey. Families will be informed of acceptances by April 15. The class will be capped at 16 students. Registration for this course closes April 1. 

Prerequisites: Spanish I and Spanish II. This is a graded course earning one year of credit and 20 service learning hours.

Arts

Photography I (A170)
$1,950
6/24 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

This course is designed to expose students to the creative and technical aspects of photography while establishing a foundation in the visual arts. Students work with both black and white film and digital cameras, building skills behind the camera, in the darkroom, and with digital imagining tools. Students will gain a solid grounding in camera controls and printmaking while learning to appreciate the role that composition, design, color and light play in the visual arts. Students will have an opportunity to exhibit and showcase their photographs and learn to use digital tools for archiving and sharing their artwork. Film and printing supplies are provided by the school. Some cameras may be available for students to borrow, although they may prefer their own cameras. This course requires students to have a 35mm single lens reflex film camera, one which allows you to adjust aperture and shutter speed. No prerequisites. This is a graded course earning one year of credit.

Digital Music Production   
$1,950
6/24 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Due to recent innovations in music production technology, anyone can now compose and produce their own musical masterpieces. In this six-week course, students will compose and produce their own original compositions using a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), while also learning the fundamentals of music theory. This course will cover many topics including song concept development, song structure, verse and chorus differentiation, effective use of the frequency spectrum, and how to mix, applying tools such as EQ, compression, and filters. Students will also learn about microphones, cables, sound propagation, gain structure, and other elements of live sound. This course is structured around the design-thinking process, which involves empathizing with an audience, iterating on a prototype, collaborating with peers, and releasing the final product for more feedback. Over the course of six weeks, students will compose and produce several original compositions and will actively participate in group studio classes, collaborative projects, and peer-review exercises.  Prerequisites: none. This is a graded course earning one year of credit. This course is non-repeatable for credit.

Physical Education

PE Yoga Fusion
$975
6/24 - 7/12
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Looking for ways to connect with your body, strengthen your muscles, improve your flexibility, and feel more grounded? In this class, students will learn the foundations of a yoga practice, the history of yoga, and the poses and breathing techniques to increase energy, focus, and inner calm. Students will be taught different ways to make poses more or less challenging depending on their need in that moment. Students will also learn and practice mindfulness and meditation techniques as a way of soothing the mind, calming the body, and lowering stress. The fusion aspect of this class allows students the opportunity for personal workouts and/or friendly team games. This PE elective may work well for athletes who would like guided time to stretch their muscles and improve their flexibility. All levels of yoga experience are welcomed in this class. Prerequisites: None. This is a graded course earning one semester of PE credit.

PE Blended Fitness
$975
7/15 - 8/2
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This class will focus on a variety of activities designed to allow students to develop and improve a variety of physical fitness attributes, including circuit training to develop strength, cardiovascular training to develop stamina, yoga for improved flexibility, as well as fun game activities. In addition, students will learn training concepts and theory, along with nutrition for movement performance. The course is designed for the student looking to develop multiple aspects of their fitness and includes outdoor activities and field trips that take advantage of the beautiful Seattle summer. Prerequisites: None. This is a graded course earning one semester of PE credit. 

College Counseling

The College Application Essay
$540
Session 1: 7/15 - 7/19
Session 2: 7/29 - 8/2
9 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Ever wonder what admissions officers really look for in a personal statement? This week-long course focuses on brainstorming, drafting, and revising the college application essay. Intended for rising seniors who want to devote a full week to writing their essay, this course offers students support and guidance through what can be an intimidating enterprise. Class activities may include guided writing, brainstorming activities, discussions, and editing workshops. By the end of the week, students who participate fully should have at least one strong draft of their personal essay completed. Prerequisites: Open to rising seniors only. This is an ungraded course earning no credit.

 
SAT Prep

$875
Session 1: 7/8 – 7/19
Session 2: 8/5 – 8/16
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (1 p.m. on mock exam days)

This two-week course will be taught by professionals from Applerouth Tutoring Services. The course will focus on all three sections of the SAT and will be dynamically tailored to meet the needs of individuals and the group. The curriculum includes math and grammar content alongside strategies for reading, writing, math, and the essay. Students will learn how to mange their attention, working memory, and other mental resources to approach the test methodically and consistently. The course will provide a variety of opportunities to practice these strategies through classwork, homework, and two full-length practice tests using official materials. Every student will receive two books: one official book of practice tests ("College Board Study Guide") and Applerouth's own "Guide to the SAT". Open to rising juniors and seniors only. This is not a graded class, but students will receive individual comments.

ACT Prep

$875
Session 1: 6/24 – 7/5
Session 2: 8/5 – 8/16
8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (1 p.m. on mock exam days)

This two-week course will be taught by professionals from Applerouth Tutoring Services. The course will focus on all four sections of the ACT and will be dynamically tailored to meet the needs of individuals and the group. The curriculum includes math and grammar content alongside strategies for reading, writing, math, science, and the essay. Students will learn how to mange their attention, working memory, and other mental resources to approach the test methodically and consistently. The course will provide a variety of opportunities to practice these strategies through classwork, homework, and two full-length practice tests using official materials. Every student will receive two books: one official book of ACT practice tests and Applerouth's own "Guide to the ACT". Open to rising juniors and seniors only. This is not a graded class, but students will receive individual comments.

Service Learning

Service Learning Experience
Course descriptions and dates will be posted on December 15.

 

 

Academic Bridges

Academic Bridges
8/5 - 8/9
8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
(Lunch is included.)

This course is open only to incoming Lakeside 9th graders.

Academic Bridges provides structured support for rising Lakeside 9th graders transitioning to high school. The one-week program is designed to help students prepare for coursework and student life at Lakeside Upper School. The activities, panels, and workshops scheduled during this week emphasize effective studying, organizational strategies, digital literacy, and self-advocacy skills. The program features morning workshops followed by several afternoon community-building activities, including two service- learning field trips and an afternoon at a puzzle room! 

Academic Bridges is geared toward students who would benefit from increased familiarity with the Lakeside campus and school culture leading into their 9th-grade year, as well as students who would like to improve their organizational and study skills. Enrollment is capped at 28 students. Prerequisites: none. This is a skill-building course that is ungraded and earns no credit. 

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